Saturday, February 04, 2012

From ACCRF - Dovitnib study opens at the University of Virginia

I received this in my email - sharing it here for information. I recommend the two ACCRF publications linked below, too. By the way, in case anyone is wondering - I think I am currently in the "no evident disease" category. I am very glad that there are studies supported through ACCRF for when/if I become a patient with progressive disease, though.


ACCRF
February 2012 

Dovitinib Study Opens
at the University of Virginia 

The University of Virginia has begun screening ACC patients with progressive disease for a new clinical trial. Supported by Novartis Pharmaceuticals, the Phase II study will enroll 10 patients to determine the efficacy and safety of the oral drug Dovitinib, an inhibitor of FGFR, VEGFR and PDGFR. ACCRF-supported studies at the University of Virginia and elsewhere have identified FGFR as a molecular target that may play an important role in ACC. Detailed information on the clinical trial is available at:

http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01524692

Only ACC patients with actively growing tumors may enroll in the clinical trial. Such patients or their physicians may contact the Clinical Research Coordinator in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA:

Erin Yarde, MS
Phone: 434-243-8588
Email: ery7b@hscmail.mcc.virginia.edu

ACC patients should discuss with their physicians whether a clinical trial is appropriate. They also may learn more information by consulting two ACCRF publications:

Looking for Signposts: An Update on Progressive Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (July 2011)

A Guide to Systemic Therapy for Patients with Progressive Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma(November 2010)

The publications discuss the history of past clinical trials involving ACC patients, recent advances in the molecular understanding of ACC, current treatment options and contact information for open clinical trials. The clinical trial of Dovitinib is an example of the welcome and growing trend of matching molecularly-targeted drugs with those patient groups deemed most likely to benefit based on basic and pre-clinical research.
 

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